Teachers are Heroes!

It’s true, teachers really are heroes! Teachers are leaders, nurses, parents, psychologists, social workers, friends, confidants, and so much more. If you’ve been waiting for the perfect time to check out Teachers Pay Teachers, it has arrived! Today (only for a few more hours!) everything on the site – in every single store! – is at least 10% off! My store has everything 28% off! That’s right! If you’ve been eyeing that perfect lesson, activity, or resource, now is the time to stop by and stock up! There probably won’t be another sale until my birthday (that’s all the way in April, people!), so get test prep, Common Core and LAFS resources, math lessons, writing resources, reading activities, and so much more! And don’t forget, there’s a TON of free stuff on the site, too – not just my store, but hundreds – thousands (literally, there are over 70K stores on TpT!) – of stores with something for everyone. So no matter what or you teach – in a classroom K-12, early childhood, college, or even homeschool, there is something for you! Head on over and check it out!

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Get your teaching resources while the getting is good!

Testing Season!

It’s that time of year – testing season is upon us. I know that in Florida, the season starts with the Writing assessment and then moves on to the state Reading and Math assessments, and then finally the End of Course assessments and semester exams. With so many states (Florida included) tying teacher pay to student performance on standardized tests, it’s to every teacher’s advantage to make sure their students perform at the highest level on these spring assessments.

I happen to be an exceptionally good test taker. I’m not sure how that came about – I don’t remember anyone sitting down and teaching me about test-taking. I know I bought the common AP study guides and ACT/SAT prep materials, so I suppose I learned lots of it there, but even as a young child in elementary and middle school, I just seemed to have a knack for test-taking. I guess that’s why I like my current job so much (testing coordinator for a large school district – I work on all the district exams). Anyway, if I’m a GOOD test taker and I don’t know how I got there, then it should come as little surprise that POOR test takers don’t have any idea how to improve. And I would say that more students than not are in the category of at least “not good,” if not “poor” test takers. There are many reasons that students do not perform to their highest ability on standardized tests. Among these are test anxiety and just not understanding basic test-taking strategies. Basic test-taking strategies are not instinctual. In fact, many basic test-taking strategies go against instinct. The point is, they must be TAUGHT. This is why companies make millions of dollars offering test-prep courses and publishing test-prep materials. But why not make these basic strategies available to ALL your students, especially those who cannot afford professional prep?

Enter my standardized testing preparation kit. This kit has 12 printable classroom mini-posters of basic multiple choice/standardized test-taking strategies, along with how to instruct students in these strategies. It also includes a study guide for students, applicable for all types of assessments! I used this every year as part of what I termed my “bubble boot camp” and had incredible success. I had students (multiple ones, every year) jump up 2 achievement levels simply by implementing these basic test-taking strategies. This kit will not only benefit students in your classes, but will help them in other areas, too. It is applicable for students at ANY level and in ANY subject. I know February may seem like a bit early to be talking about the state tests, but they are right around the corner, and if you start now, you can get through all 12 tips in time for students to internalize them and apply them on all the tests they will be taking this spring.

This kit will be MOST beneficial to your low-achieving or under-achieving students – those “bottom quartile” kids who shut down after the first question and “Christmas tree” the entire test. However, this will also benefit your high-achieving students by giving them tools to slow down and check their work, increasing their performance as well. This truly is a must-have resource for every teacher. You owe it to your students to give them a basic crash-course in test prep. And I know – I KNOW – what you’re thinking! My students already know this stuff, I teach juniors (or seniors!) and they’ve been testing since they were in first grade! Surely they know this stuff! But they don’t. THEY DON’T. I’m telling you, I had seniors who couldn’t bubble correctly to save their lives. I had secondary students who honestly – HONESTLY – did not know they had to put their answers on the Scantron answer sheet and just marked them in their booklet. I swear to you, the tips and strategies in this kit are things that you THINK students know – that they SHOULD know – but they don’t. Not all of them. I promise you that if you have never done a basic test-taking strategies instruction workshop with your students, they will benefit from this. My students did.

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Give your students their best chance!

Teaching with Power Point in the Middle School Math Classroom

First of all, I want to apologize for being a little lax with my posting. My day job has been especially hectic for the past month or so and it has just been really difficult to find time to write an entry and get it up on time. So I’m sorry for that. I’ve also done quite a few entries highlighting ELA topics, so this week, I’ve decided to focus on math.

When I first began teaching, I started as a middle school math teacher. My first two years were as a 7th grade pre-Algebra and 8th grade Algebra I Honors teacher. I found that my students did not have the first clue about how to take notes, and it was very difficult to get them to stay on task and listen to what I was saying. I found this more problematic with my “regular” pre-Algebra 7th grade students. I also was involved in a lot of outside-the-classroom activities like district assessment panels, professional development, etc., and I missed a LOT of school. I had a LOT of substitutes. I had to overcome the challenges I was facing.

I found the answer to this through Power Point lessons. I created Power Point lessons for various topics we were studying, and began teaching with them. It was like a miracle had happened in my classroom. Students began taking notes (pretty decent ones, really – the Power Points actually taught them note-taking skills), they began sitting and listening, and it was easy for the subs because all they had to do was play the Power Point and walk the kids through the lesson. Of course, I answered questions when I got back and assessed their understanding, but usually the re-teaching and clarification needed was minimal.

I was SO happy with the success of my Power Points in my 7th grade class, that I began using them the next year with my special 8th grade students who had taken Algebra I as 7th graders and didn’t have any other math classes to take. Our middle school didn’t offer Geometry and there were no high schools close enough to bus them to take the course there, so I told my administration I’d create a curriculum for them that taught/dealt with lots of advanced math topics and would prepare them for Geometry. It was really cool. We did a lot of Geometry prep work (you know, the fun stuff like postulates and theorems!) but we also did some advanced (for 8th graders) Statistics work like standard deviation. There were only 6 of them and it was probably the most fun I’ve ever had teaching. Anyway, I started using Power Point lessons with them as well, and they worked very nicely.

I have since become much more familiar with the PPT software and have updated my old PPT lessons and created new ones. The majority of my lessons are now (with the new CCSS) aligned with 6th grade topics, but I do have PPT lessons aligned with other grades’ standards. Additionally, the lessons that are now “6th grade” could certainly be used with other grade levels either for remediation or enrichment. I have so many of these PPT lessons that I have bundled them by standard. I have a set of 6th grade PPT lessons that are all aligned to the Number System standards.

Another great benefit of these lessons is that it is a way to incorporate technology into lessons. Many teachers find it difficult to use lots of the new technology, but on most new teacher evaluations, the use of technology is a component of being rated an “outstanding” (or some high-level) instructor. PPT is a very easy technology to use: all my lessons require no knowledge of the software other than how to open the file and use the arrow keys or mouse (or remote clicker, if you have one) to advance the slides or go backwards. In this bundle there are ten lessons:

  • Adding and subtracting decimals
  • Multiplying decimals
  • Dividing decimals
  • Greatest common factor
  • Least common multiple
  • Dividing fractions by fractions
  • Long division
  • Ordering integers
  • Integers and absolute value
  • Inverse numbers and operations

Each lesson follows an “I do,” “We do,” “You do” model. There is instruction/examples, guided practice, and independent practice in each lesson. There are visual examples and whenever possible, I try to use “real-life” examples. If you are working on any of these concepts this semester, this bundle may be for you! All of these lessons are available separately, but you save some money by buying the bundle.

If you don’t teach 6th grade or if these concepts aren’t being covered this semester, don’t worry! I have over 60 math products for grades ranging from 3rd to 9th! Power Points aren’t the only thing I do, either, so if they aren’t your cup of tea, there’re lots of other things you could check out!

2015 Mad Eye Moody Productions 6th grade number systems bundle

Check out the bundle!