The Continuous Improvement Model

When I started teaching English, I was terrified. I had few ideas about how to effectively communicate what I knew about English and reading comprehension to my students. See, I was (am) really good at English. It was my strongest subject in school. I love to read. I love to write. It comes naturally to me. I rarely struggled with it. So when I encountered students who weren’t good at reading or writing, I didn’t know what to do with them. I had no strategies for how to help them learn and grow. My process for teaching writing evolved into something very successful, but that’s a topic for another entry. My process for teaching reading, however, improved as a result of my being assigned to teach a semester course of Advanced Reading, in which the curriculum embedded something called “FCIM,” which stands for “Florida’s Continuous Improvement Model.” The Continuous Improvement Model – or CIM, for short – operates under the best-practice assumption that education is a cycle of teaching and assessing, and is best communicated through some variation of the research-based strategy “model-guide-practice” or “I do, we do, you do.”

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I wasn’t overly impressed with the quality of the curriculum – as is true for most large curriculum companies, there were errors, lack of explanation for answers, and virtually no guide for teaching metacognition (another research-based instructional component). But I did like, and find effective, the overarching principles of the instructional model. It was on this that I based my own CIM resources.

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These resources are intended to be used in conjunction with other curriculum, instruction, and assessment. They should be a component of the Continuous Improvement Model within any classroom. They should be used to help the teacher gather data on student comprehension and achievement and that should drive further instruction.

This particular CIM targets the Common Core Reading: Literature Standard 1 for grades 9-10. It has a complete teacher script for lesson 1, which models metacognition for students and goes through how to determine the correct answer for the correct reason. It has a guided lesson script for lesson 2, which helps take students through the same process before trying it completely on their own in lesson 3. Although, lesson 3 has thorough explanations for the correct and incorrect answers so that it can be a part of the Continuous Improvement Model process.

 

Additionally, it offers differentiation options by having two complete sets of lessons: one using multiple-choice questions and one using open-response questions. This resource combines 2 essential features of quality education: effective use of time and best-practices teaching methods. Finding supplementary materials that specifically target a single standard are difficult to come by. You either have to take a resource and pick it apart to use only the questions that apply to the standard you’re targeting or you have to make it yourself. And few teachers have the time (or inclination, for that matter) to pick passages and write standards-based questions for them. This takes that prep-work piece away and does that labor for you. However, you, as the teacher, get to decide how to use the resource, how to differentiate and scaffold it, and even whether or not to use pairs or small groups – all while knowing you are engaging your students in the model-guide-practice research-based teaching strategy and gathering information and data you can use as a part of your classroom’s Continuous Improvement Model.

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Although this is my first CIM for this level, I have a complete RL/RI (all 17 standards) CIM set for 6th grade and I’m almost halfway done with the complete 8th grade set as well. Eventually, the intention is to have sets for grades 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9-10.

How can you use this resource effectively? Many teachers who have purchased from my CIM line use this resource as bell work. Others use it as a part of a focus workshop. The product itself has suggestions for differentiation as well as collaborative work.

This line is also highly rated by teachers who have purchased the resource(s). Here are some of the things they’ve had to say about the different products in the CIM line:

On RL.9-10.1:

  • On July 16, 2016, Catherine R. said: This will be a valuable resource to walk students through the process of reading and using evidence to respond to questions. Thanks for sharing.

On RL.8.2:

  • On July 13, 2016, Wacky Apple (TpT Seller) said: Exactly what I needed.

On RL.6 (various):

  • On March 29, 2016, Megan F. said: One of the best resources I have seen in a while
  • On June 7, 2016, Rebecca Harris (TpT Seller) said: Excellent resource! I look forward to using these with my students this year!
  • On April 21, 2016, Janine L. said: Looking forward to using these to review the standards my students performed poorly on for their district assessments.
  • On January 24, 2016, Crystal V. said: I own the RL bundle and the RI bundle. Yes, they are a little bit pricey but I think it is absolutely fair considering the amount of content. You definitely get what you pay for! I love using these as Bell Ringer Activities, and to remediate standards since testing is coming up. Thanks!
  • On November 20, 2015, Shakera W. said: Thank you! this resource is so helpful for intervention! Thank you so much! Very thorough resources!
  • On January 20, 2016, Emily S. said: Great resource! Such a time-saver! Thanks 🙂
  • On October 14, 2015, Shakera W. said: Great intervention tool! Thank you!

If this sounds intriguing, head on over and check it out!

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