Newest Resource Reveal!

I’m excited to announce the completion of the entire grade 8 ELA Common Core (and LAFS, for Florida) CIM series bundle! It’s taken me about a year to complete, and I’m very pleased with what I’ve been able to create for you. In the bundle, there are 17 different resources. Each targets an individual standard with three mini-lessons. Each CIM uses excerpts that have been adapted to be (or were, in their original format, already) appropriate for 8th-grade readers. This was assured through the use of the Lexile® analyzer as well as several other online readability calculators (Flesch, etc.).

If you’ve never heard about or used my CIM resources, they use the research-based “model – teach – assess” technique. They are quick (10-15 min) mini-lessons that target specific standards. The only Common Core practice I’ve been able to find is general and mixed standards. Mine is the only one I know of that does individual standard, targeted instruction and practice. It’s low-prep and easy to implement. It even includes suggestions for differentiation and extension!

I know many of you have been just waiting for me to finish the rest of the bundle, and now it’s finally ready for you! Buying the bundle instead of all the individual CIMs will save you a, well, bundle! If you’re looking for a quick, targeted, and easy resource for these standards, come check them out!

ALL RL.8 RI.8 Bundle

Common Core Practice for RL.8.4, RL.8.5, and RL.8.6

For those of you who read regularly, you’ll remember that I’m working on my 8th grade line of Continuous Improvement Model mini-lesson resources. I’m making good progress and I have recently finished and posted these resources:

CCSS.ELA.RL.8.4

8th grade CIM RL4

CCSS.ELA.RL.8.5

8th grade RL5 1

and

CCSS.ELA.RL.8.6

8th grade CIM RL6 1

I’ve also bundled these so you can save over 10% if you purchase them together.

8th grade CIM RL4-6

If you’ve never heard about or used my CIM resources, they use the research-based “model – teach – assess” technique. They are quick (10-15 min) mini-lessons that target specific standards. The only Common Core practice I’ve been able to find is general and mixed-standards. Mine is the only one I know of that does individual standard, targeted instruction and practice. It’s low-prep and easy to implement.

If you’re looking for quick, targeted, and easy resources for this standards, come check them out!

 

New Resource for RI.6.8!

It took me an extra week, but I finally finished my newest CIM for RI.6.8: Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.

6th grade CIM RI8 a

This CIM follows the same format as my others, and it uses seminal US documents – adapted for 6th-grade students: Patrick Henry and the Declaration of Independence. So not only is this a great resource for 6th grade ELA teachers, but it could be incorporated into a Social Studies classroom as well if you’re studying the American Revolution time period!

There are 3 questions per lesson, so depending on your students it could take anywhere from 3-5 days (if you’re not familiar with my CIMs, there are 3 separate lessons: I do, we do, you do, and they are designed to take about 10 minute each). Of course, just like my other CIMs, included are 1) pages to display questions with answer choices and questions without answer choices, depending how you choose to teach; 2) information for how to get to the excerpts for each day to display, as well as graphs for lessons 1 & 2 to display; 3) the lesson scripts/guides for the 3 lessons. Pages for students are also included (but in separate files).

6th grade CIM RI8 b 6th grade CIM RI8 c 6th grade CIM RI8 d

If you’re wondering if the CIM model is right for you, check out my freebie: RL.6.1

I’m working on RI.6.9 this week and plan to have the RI 7-9 bundle, the whole RI 1-9 bundle, and the full 6th grade CIMs (all RL and all RI standards) up by Cyber Monday, so be sure to follow my blog and my TpT store for updates on when these great resources will be available! Also, I will begin work on the 8th grade standards next, inter-spliced with CIMS from other grade levels 3-9/10.

Have a great week!

My Newest Common Core Practice Bundle

I’ve been MIA for a while because I grossly underestimated how much work it would be to go back into the classroom! But I put in a lot of work into making my Continuous Improvement Models (CIMs) for RI.6.4-6 (Author’s Craft & Structure) so I really wanted to post about it. I just want to give an overview of the CIMs in the bundle and explain to you why you should be interested in my resources if you teach upper elementary/lower middle English/Language Arts.

I’ve been working on my CIM for RI.6.7 and I was having trouble finding texts and even looking for resources with sample questions to make sure that my resources are valid and on point with the standards and other resources out there. Well, I started realizing there weren’t any resources out there that target individual standards. Sure, there are lots of things out there for teachers that have texts and questions for Common Core, but everything I’ve found gives teachers a handful of questions that target multiple standards. For example, I might get 7 questions, but each one only targets 1 standard, so I really only get 1 – or maybe 2 – questions on any given standard. And nothing I’ve found uses the format I do – the “I do,” “we do,” “you do.” And none of the resources I’ve found give teachers the tools to work through teaching students how to correctly identify answers for the given questions. Everything I’ve found only identifies which standard the question assesses and the correct answer. Sometimes it will have reasoning for why it is the correct answer, but nothing more than a few sentences. My resources are much more in depth. There are 3 mini-lessons for an individual standard. In this particular bundle, each individual lesson has at least 2 questions. For lesson 1, there is a full script that explains, in depth, how to determine the correct answer(s). In lesson 2, there is a script to guide students through determining the correct answer(s) themselves. In lesson 3, there is ample explanation on why the incorrect answers are incorrect and why the correct answer is correct, in case students need re-teaching or explanation.

If this sounds like something your students could use, check out my newest bundle for Reading Informational Text Grade 6 standards 4, 5, & 6.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/6th-Grade-Common-Core-Practice-RI4-5-6-Authors-Craft-and-Structure-Cluster-2120055

Making Poetry Meaningful

I am a poetry snob. Perhaps one could call me uncultured, but I am very picky about the poetry I choose to read. To be perfectly honest, I really only enjoy two poets: Edgar Allen Poe, and myself. Well, in general. There are isolated poems from various poets that I enjoy. “The Charge of the Light Brigade” (Tennyson), “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” (Dickenson), and a few others. So suffice it to say that I empathized with my students when it came time for our poetry unit each year. Writing poetry comes easily to me, but that’s not the case for most students. In fact, in my years of teaching English, I found that the predominant reason for my students disliking poetry was that they struggled with writing it. Also, they’d had countless other teachers who had made them memorize and recite poems (I won’t editorialize on that practice…the fact that I NEVER made my students memorize and recite poetry in my class should speak for itself), which mostly served to turn them off of poetry completely.

I found that they also struggled with identifying different poetic devices within poems and analyzing poetry for any sort of meaning. Often, this was due to the fact that the poets they were forced to read were dry and confusing. What if my students were just like me? What if the poet they would enjoy reading the most were themselves? How could I get my students to write meaningful poems when they didn’t know how to write poetry?

First, I started small. I had to disabuse my students of the notion that all poetry had to rhyme or have some set rhythm and meter. That was difficult. Once I got that through their heads, though, I would show them examples of acrostic poems. I always had my students begin with an acrostic poem of their name. Eventually, the majority of my students were able to construct a reasonable attempt at an acrostic poem.

To help them understand rhyme and rhythm (and meter) I would use songs/song lyrics. This is also how I taught the poetic device: refrain. The jump from song to poem was easy with the “Battle Hymn of the Republic.” I found (in my biased opinion, of course) that the best poems for teaching meter/rhythm were Poe’s poems. My two favorites are “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven.” Incidentally, when my own middle school teacher required that we choose a poem to memorize and recite, I chose “The Raven” simply to be obnoxious. It was the longest one I thought I could actually memorize. I got about 3 stanzas in before she forced me to stop and sit down. Yeah, I was “that kid.”

Occasionally, I would give the traditional quiz on the various poetic devices, but I never gave an end-of-unit test. Instead, I wanted what they’d learned to be meaningful to them. From the onset of the unit, I let them know that they would be creating their very own poetry product: a calendar. I would usually have it be the full next calendar year, January-December, although, that might change based on the time of year during which the poetry unit was taught.

I picked 11 of the most important (to me, as the teacher; the most prolific, common, whatever you want to call them) poetic devices we studied during the unit. Then, I told students that they would be responsible for writing their own poems for each month: one poem per month; one device per poem. The 12th month/poem was a free choice for them. I encouraged them to relate the poem to the month, season, or event that occurred during the month. I strongly suggested they think about personal connections to months: birthdays, family trips/vacations, etc. Of course I gave them the major holidays (New Year’s Day, Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, Easter, Mother’s Day, Memorial Day, Father’s Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas), but also suggested things like winter break, spring break, exams, summer break, back to school, etc.

I printed out the calendars for them and gave them free reign to decorate them according to their poems (if it focused on a birthday, then they would label that day on the calendar and illustrate it appropriately; if it was Valentine’s Day, same thing). They left ample space for their poems on each month.

I found that the vast majority of my students responded well to this authentic task. I had lots of students who would decide to give the calendar as a gift to a parent or relative (depending on the time of year you can suggest it as a Mother’s Day gift or a holiday gift for a parent/relative). Many of them expressed their excitement that the calendar would be hanging somewhere (on the fridge, in a parent/relative’s office, etc.), and they put in quite a bit of effort. It became meaningful to them. They suddenly were able to write poetry because they had a purpose and context. Over the years I got some very poignant, touching work (Veteran’s Day poems, poems to grandparents or others who had died, etc.). Not all of the poetry was going to win awards, but the students took the assignment seriously and did a reasonably good job. I was easily able to tell who had mastered the various poetic devices and other literary concepts.

The best part about this assignment was that it could be tailored to any level. I started with it in 7th grade and used it all the way up through my high school students. I had poems as simple as limericks and haikus all the way up to full-blown Shakespearean sonnets. And not only did the kids (many of them, anyway) actually enjoy writing the poems, but they (dare I say “all”?) enjoyed coloring and illustrating the months in the calendar. And I was able to photocopy the best ones to keep and display in my room that year and use as examples in subsequent years.

Creating the calendar (in its entirety – writing the poems, illustrating the pages, etc.) usually took about 2 weeks. Sometimes less, depending on the students, but never more. With my honors kids, I would often assign a certain amount as homework so it didn’t stretch too far into class time. I found that the kids needed my help, though, in many cases, so I shied away from assigning the whole (or majority of) thing as homework.

If this sounds like something you’d like to do in your classroom, you are in luck. I’ve already created the templates and rubrics for the project. All you have to do is decide which poetic devices you want to assess.

Click here for the Poetry Calendar Project.

Coming of Age

Picture this: Small-town girl’s best friend moves away the summer before high school starts. Small-town girl is insecure, introverted, and lonely. New neighbor moves in across the street: It’s another rising freshman from New York City. New girl is everything Small-town girl wants to be: pretty, talented, popular. They become unlikely friends. School starts: Cue the drama. New girl gets noticed by a member of the basketball team and invites her to high school party. Both girls go, and New girl gets raped by 3 boys on the team. Small-town girl wants to tell someone; New girl makes her promise to keep quiet. Small-town girl struggles with the decision to be loyal to New girl and keep her friendship or be honest and tell someone what happened and get New girl the help she needs. New girl begins drinking, smoking, cutting, and sleeping around. Drama ensues. The girls fight. New-girl climbs to the top of a water tower during a storm and dies. Did she fall? Did she jump? Small-town girl doesn’t know. Guilt eats away at her. She blames herself. She can’t handle the guilt. She starts cutting. She starts failing her classes. She climbs to the top of the water tower, and…she realizes she wants to live and decides to ask for help. She turns her life around. She comes of age.

purple storm kindle edition

Sound like just the kind of angst-filled story your students will love? Mine did. I read the novel over the course of a week and my students begged – begged, pleaded, cajoled – every day to continue the story. They loved it even more when they learned it was inspired by actual events. When it ended, they were devastated. They demanded more be written. I asked them what could make it better: they gave feedback. Based on that feedback, I crafted a revised version of the novel. That’s right, I wrote this story, and used feedback from the target audience (young adults) to make the book everything they wanted it to be.

It’s short (just 124 pages in paperback), readable, and engaging.

purple storm paperback edition

Buy a copy and see if you think your students will like it, then buy a copy for your classroom. Or, just buy a copy for your classroom and see what happens when one of them picks it up. Who knows, if it becomes a hit, you could even do a whole unit on it (which I’ve created – comprehension questions, vocabulary, graphic organizers, discussion questions, quizzes, and a test – everything you need).

If you teach a non-English subject, pass the information along to your English-teaching colleagues. They’ll thank you!

Novel - Purple Storm

Here are the links to the novel:

To buy paperback

To buy on Kindle

To buy the unit on TpT

Teachers are Heroes!

It’s true, teachers really are heroes! Teachers are leaders, nurses, parents, psychologists, social workers, friends, confidants, and so much more. If you’ve been waiting for the perfect time to check out Teachers Pay Teachers, it has arrived! Today (only for a few more hours!) everything on the site – in every single store! – is at least 10% off! My store has everything 28% off! That’s right! If you’ve been eyeing that perfect lesson, activity, or resource, now is the time to stop by and stock up! There probably won’t be another sale until my birthday (that’s all the way in April, people!), so get test prep, Common Core and LAFS resources, math lessons, writing resources, reading activities, and so much more! And don’t forget, there’s a TON of free stuff on the site, too – not just my store, but hundreds – thousands (literally, there are over 70K stores on TpT!) – of stores with something for everyone. So no matter what or you teach – in a classroom K-12, early childhood, college, or even homeschool, there is something for you! Head on over and check it out!

sale_300_250

Get your teaching resources while the getting is good!

Football Freebie! 11/18/14

I know, I know, I’m cheating again this week – but I’m hoping to maybe have a real post later this week. In honor of the (now #6 in the country!) Buckeyes’ victory Saturday against Minnesota (or as my goofy husband calls it, “tiny Pepsi”…back off, ladies, he’s all mine…), I have prepared for you the vertical alignment of the CCSS Language standards. I used it all last week in my work with my district’s second semester exams, and I thought (and hope) it might come in handy for all the teachers out there. It’s definitely great to see the progression of grammar, punctuation, etc. in an easy-to-read chart format.

11-18-14

Here’s an better (albeit cropped) shot:

11-18-14a

ccss vertical alignment L

Football Freebie!

 

This coming Saturday, Ohio State takes on Indiana at home. I will be on Thanksgiving break all week and won’t be able to post the inevitable (sorry, IU fans, but…seriously…) freebie earned by the Buckeyes’ victory. Instead, I will be scheduling a pre-Cyber Monday event at my store. This Sunday, everything will be on sale for 24 hours! Stay tuned for more information.

Go Buckeyes!

Football Freebie 11/11/14!! Literary Analysis

O-H!!!

If you’re a Buckeye fan, you know how to answer that cheer! [I-O!!!!]

Big congrats to my Ohio State Buckeyes for cementing their spot as the leader in the Big Ten! No close game this week, we put the smack down on Sparty! As your reward, here is this week’s football freebie!

For ten years of my life, I worked on writing a novel. Once it was finally finished, I read it to my students, who gave me amazing feedback so I could improve it for my target audience. Now, the novel is published and for sale on Amazon in both Kindle and paperback format. I also have an entire unit to go with the novel that is available on my TpT site. You can also purchase the .pdf version of the novel on the TpT site as well. However, I want as many people as possible to be able to expose their students to the novel, so my freebie this week is the first chapter of the novel and some questions (short answer, discussion, etc.), vocabulary, etc. There are great opportunities to explore figurative language, characterization, dialogue, and various story elements. Download the freebie, and if you and your students get hooked, come back for more!

The novel is targeted at teens aged 13-17. The story is about two girls who become somewhat unlikely friends, and the main character has to make a decision about loyalty vs. honesty, and her choice leads her down a path to coming of age.

Chapter 1 Purple Storm freebie

Football Freebie!

Be Prompt; Be Prepared

I know I feel this way and I am getting the feeling that so many other teachers are feeling similarly: These new standards and unknown state assessments make us feel like we’re in a ship in a storm without a map. Or a captain. Or maybe even the ship. Whether you think it’s ethical or not (or just somewhere in the gray area), test-prep is a huge industry. Barron’s makes a gazillion dollars a year on AP prep. There is ACT and SAT prep materials. Kaplan charges people hundreds of dollars to prep for major tests at the post-secondary level (and below). State tests, in the past, have had a variety of test-prep materials. Probably the most-used (most-valuable, etc.) are the released tests. You get old versions of the assessments and you give them to your students to practice. Makes sense, right? I mean, that’s how kids study for and pass the AP tests. Many states even had targeted assessment resources – workbooks with practice items, CD-ROMS with practice tools, even whole websites with practice for students across the grades.

But what happens when the tests change? And not just a little change, either, but a change so significant and monumental that there simply aren’t any really good ways to institute formal test prep. Whether your state has adopted the PARCC, Smarter Balance, FSA (for Florida), or some other new tool to assess the CCSS, you are probably desperately looking around for resources to help prepare your students for these exams. I mean, really, all you know is that your students will be tested on how well they “master” the standards. But what does that really mean? Really? No one knows. Yes, PARCC has a nice site with a handful of sample items. Yes, FSA released item specs with context-less contextual sample questions (with no answers, I might add). And there is a sample test. But seriously, how helpful is all of that? Minimally. It’s better than nothing, yes, but it’s nowhere near what teachers need. Or what their students need. Don’t even get me started on the ambiguity of the standards themselves. The interpretations are far and wide, which makes it virtually impossible to know not only what will be asked, but how the assessments will ask it.

It’s frustrating. It’s beyond frustrating. Do I have all the answers? No. But I do work with the new standards every day (yes, I’m in Florida, and technically we have the LAFS, not the CCSS, but at the secondary [6-12] level, the LAFS are, for all intents and purposes, identical to the CCSS), and I work with people who get to go to all sorts of symposiums and trainings to learn about the new standards and rubrics. I don’t know exactly how the different companies are going to interpret and assess the standards, but I am certainly more familiar with the standards and their potential assessments than an average classroom teacher. Therefore, based on my own trainings and those I work with, I have created question stems for the standards grades 6-8 and the 9-10 and 11-12 standards. Each level (6-8) has over 200 question stems. My middle school documents are extraordinarily popular (and highly rated), and I have noticed that many teachers buy not just one level, but multiple levels of stems. In response, I have decided to bundle my 6-8 stems so teachers can get all 3 levels for a reduced price. I am also working on revising and bundling my high school stems documents, so if you haven’t become a follower of my store, go to the link and become a follower so you can get updates when I post new products.

I hope these stems are helpful for you in your classroom. You can use them as discussion starters, for traditional (multiple choice) assessments, or for extended responses. You can even give them to students and have them make their own questions from various literature. If you purchase the bundle (or any single stems documents), please be sure to review the product!

ccss stems grades 6-8 bundle

CCSS Stem Bundle

And don’t forget to check back tomorrow for my football freebie since the Buckeyes showed Sparty who’s boss in the Big Ten!